Just 41% of HIV+ Russians are taking antiretroviral therapies—some of the lowest rates anywhere.   While Russia doesn’t lack resources to fight its spiraling HIV epidemic, thriving misinformation campaigns mean many Russians deny their diagnosis, and reject treatment.  …

People generally flee epidemic hotspots—the CDC’s Epidemic Intelligence Service does just the opposite, writes medical journalist Seema Yasmin, who was a member of this “elite squad of contagion-hunters.”   They are the disease detectives tracking COVID-19, and their job is…

Editors’ Note: This week we will highlight 5 takes on ending HIV in the US by 2030, from the Fall 2019 issue of Hopkins Bloomberg Public Health magazine. Read the complete set here.

Nipah virus—with no treatment or vaccine 20 years post-discovery, despite its status as a WHO priority disease—has serious epidemic potential, warn international experts convening in Singapore, Reuters reports.   The virus has ignited outbreaks with mortality rates of…

Dengue is set to threaten 6 billion people by 2080—60% of the current world population—according to study in Nature Microbiology.  

As soda sales plummet in the US amid growing obesity concerns, Coca-Cola has enjoyed a growing foothold in China—now Coke’s 3rd largest market by volume.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo’s Ebola case count continues to rise, but the WHO cited a promising development yesterday: Activity is declining in the hotspot of Beni.   The Numbers, according to the latest health ministry update:

More than half of people living with HIV have unsuppressed viral loads, and about 9.4 million are likely unaware that they are HIV positive, a UNAIDS report released Friday revealed—showing that the epidemic is far from over.

The unprecedented response to the AIDS epidemic is often viewed as the inaugural moment of the young field of global health. But “it is an error to assign a single disease as its point of origin,” writes Richard Horton—doing so obscures the power dynamics that underlie…

Diabetes cases among the 60% of Guatemalans who belong to the indigenous population “may be of epidemic proportion,” according to a new study that found rates almost double a 2003 estimate.