Last week in Forbes, Madhukar Pai wrote about the failings of reciprocity in global health last week. He closed that piece by requesting crowd-sourced solutions for making reciprocity a reality.   Here’s a sampling of feedback that the director of McGill Global Health…

Reciprocity is a core tenet of global health. Does it play out in practice? Not really, writes Madhukar Pai in this 2-part series.   For every 10 US-based students hosted in an African University, just 1 African travels the other way. The barriers to entry are many.  …

Ample research cites unequal distribution of child mortality according to wealth, geography, and education. Yet few studies address ethnicity, write Joanna R.M. Armstrong Schellenberg and Della Berhanu of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

Not a single country is doing enough to protect children’s lives and their futures, according to a landmark report from a WHO-UNICEF-Lancet commission.   Despite that bleak assessment, the report urges countries to learn from some countries’ successes.   South Korea, Norway…

Incarcerated adolescents exhibit a troublingly high lifetime prevalence of mental and physical health challenges—from suicidal ideation to substance use, abnormal cervical screening results, and premature death, according to a Lancet Public Health review.    

Ramped-up cancer services could save 7 million lives over the next decade—and addressing huge service gaps between rich and poor countries is key to success, according to a new WHO report.  

A new, more affordable pneumonia vaccine is high on the agenda at the inaugural Global Forum on Childhood Pneumonia in Barcelona this week. Prohibitive costs mean 55 million children remain unvaccinated, many of them in middle-income countries that don’t get cut-rate…

It’s been a decade since WHO endorsed a 19-item surgical checklist covering everything from patient identity to ensuring anesthetics are on hand.      Research has shown the checklist reduces major complications by 60%. Yet adherence is inconsistent.   Wealthy countries use…

The WHO has approved a biosimilar version of Herceptin—a “cheap copy” of the gamechanging breast cancer drug.    Herceptin targets HER2+ breast cancer and is considered an “essential medicine,” but its price tag—$20k per patient—is prohibitive.    A disproportionate number…

More than a third of low- and middle-income countries face a double burden of malnutrition—simultaneous  undernutrition and overweight/obesity, the WHO reports—drawing from a