Rich countries’ demand for hot commodities is contributing to malaria risk in developing nations.   A new Nature study traced 20% of malaria risk in deforestation hotspots to international commodities like coffee, cotton, and timber. The US, UK, France, Germany, and Japan…

Insecticide-treated bed nets are frontline soldiers in the global malaria fight.  

There is a strong case to be made for testing drugs in the disease-endemic settings.   For example, a malaria drug tested on well-nourished participants in the US may prove less effective when put into practice in Kenya, where comorbidities like malnutrition are a real…

After 3 decades of research, Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi are piloting the first malaria vaccine in babies.   The vaccine is only about 40% effective, but Mosquirix is being given a shot anyway amid rising resistance to treatment and stalling progress against the disease.  …

After 3 decades of research, Ghana, Kenya, and Malawi are piloting the first malaria vaccine in babies.   The vaccine is only about 40% effective, but Mosquirix is being given a shot anyway amid rising resistance to treatment and stalling progress against the disease.  …

This wasn't your average classroom experiment.  Children at a North London school were asked to bring in samples of family soup recipes from around the world—Imperial College London researchers tested them for malaria-fighting powers. Some of these home broth remedies…

In areas ridden with malaria, asymptomatic infections provide a constant, hidden reservoir that helps the malaria parasite maximize its footprint. In sub-Saharan Africa—home to 90% of malaria cases in 2017—24% of people harbor these covert infections.  

Tens of thousands of refugees from Burundi live in Rwanda’s Mahama refugee camp. For years, they faced a major threat from malaria. But since 2017, malaria cases are down 82%. How did they do it? A lot of credit goes to indoor insecticide spraying…

Scientists reconstructed a 50,000-year-old gene sequence to find out how Plasmodium falciparum—one of the deadliest malaria parasites—jumped from gorillas to humans. How did it happen? A gene in the ancient sequence produced an “ancestral RH5 protein” that was…

If Bill Gates could solve one problem, it would be malnutrition. And with the the latest scientific advancements, it can be done in the next 20 years, Gates writes in The Telegraph, ahead of his Hawking Fellowship lecture at Cambridge University today.