Female surgeons faced harsher critique for mistakes and minimized credit for successes in a recent study illustrating gender bias in medicine.

In Malawi, 35% of people sampled in a hospital survey reported living with an untreated condition requiring surgery. A majority of the nearly 3,000 respondents to the survey, conducted by group of researchers led by Carlos Varela of Kamuzu Central Hospital, did not seek…

A mere 1 in 200,000 births results in conjoined twins.   A case study of 22-month-old conjoined girls from East Africa, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, reveals how in wealthy countries, the option of surgery still poses an agonizing dilemma.   At home,…

The advent of anesthesia brought new horizons—and myriad infections—to surgery. But it didn’t really take off until Joseph Lister’s invention of antisepsis curbed the scourge of “slow moving execution” by infection, argues Lindsey Fitzharris in The Butchering Art: Joseph…

In Part II of GHN's Exclusive 3-part special series on burns in Nepal—the Untold Global Health Story of 2017—Joanne Silberner puts the extent of untreated burns in Nepal into focus: Of an estimated 56,000 burn injuries in the country in 2008, only about 1,000 received …

Intro to the Series Burns cause an estimated 180,000 deaths each year, yet they rarely rate a significant spot on the global health agenda.

In Part I of GHN's Exclusive 3-part special series on burns in Nepal—the Untold Global Health Story of 2017—Joanne Silberner profiles the efforts of surgeon Shankar Man Rai to help forgotten patients in Nepal.

NEW YORK—In the quest to end preventable maternal mortality, safe surgery deserves greater attention as a key strategy, said advocates gathered at a UN General Assembly side event yesterday at the Roosevelt Hotel.

 

The surgical needs of poor countries—especially in OB/GYN and orthopedics—match up poorly to the skills of altruistic US-trained general surgeons most eager to volunteer, a new paper in World Journal of Surgery shows.