While California investigates a case of plague in a child who fell ill following visits to state parks, the irrepressible Crawford Kilian delivers a historical spin on the news.

It’s hard to believe, but twittering Texans tweet about donuts more than any other food. That disturbing piece of news comes courtesy of a University of Vermont analysis of 50 million geotagged tweets from 49 states (What’s up Hawaii?) to estimate how many calories people…

Ahead of the International Conference on Family Planning in Nusa Dua, Indonesia November 9–12, 2015, conference organizers are inviting nominations for outstanding country, organization, or person for the EXCELL Awards. The awards provide an opportunity to celebrate…

About 60% of the adult population of the United Arab Emirates is missing teeth because of gum disease brought about by a sugary diet and poor dental care habits, dentists say. They blame social stigma, fear of dentists and lack of education about treatment options for why…

When HIV began spreading around the globe in the 80s, India had a secret weapon. “Many researchers predicted a crisis unlike those in any other nation. But it never happened—in part because India had Suniti Solomon…” writes Michael Specter in this tribute to the AIDS-…

It started in the spring of 2010. A 61-year-old in the Kazakh village of Krasnagorsk, collapsed. She slept for 4 days and remembered nothing when she awoke. Since that first case, waves of residents have experienced the same scenario and received the same diagnosis:…

Over 1 million people die each year in traffic-related deaths—including pedestrians, drivers, passengers and cyclists. The problem affects nations rich and poor, and can be blamed on poor infrastructure (Mongolia’s dearth of traffic lights) and customs (in Mumbai, the…

Christian, Islamic and other faith-based organizations provide 40% or more of the health care in the world’s poorest places, but are invisible to global health researchers, according to a series of papers published in The Lancet.

US penitentiaries, which are routinely accused of being steeped in a culture of violence, consistently bar UN officials, armed with mandates from the Geneva-based Human Rights Council, from visiting.

A $2 billion global fund is needed to correct the vaccine development crisis, report a trio of global health specialists in a New England Journal of Medicine paper. Vaccines are both badly needed and feasible for many infectious diseases—Ebola, MERS, West Nile virus—yet…