A big GHN welcome to the 4,400 attendees of the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene conference to GHN's hometown, lovely Baltimore, Maryland. If you're attending, please stop by GHN's booth, #317 and say hi. If you're not in Charm City, watch the following…

I recently met Ankitkumar, an 8-year-old schoolboy from Bihar, India, who 3 years ago developed discoloration on his skin, which was mildly anesthetic. Little known to the medical staff who initially treated him, these were the first symptoms of leprosy.

In Nepal, an estimated 56,000 people are burned seriously each year—yet only about 1,000 receive proper treatment. Through the lens of Rojita Adhikari, the photographer who accompanied journalist Joanne Silberner to cover burns in Nepal—the Untold Global Health Story of…

In Part II of GHN's Exclusive 3-part special series on burns in Nepal—the Untold Global Health Story of 2017—Joanne Silberner puts the extent of untreated burns in Nepal into focus: Of an estimated 56,000 burn injuries in the country in 2008, only about 1,000 received …

Intro to the Series Burns cause an estimated 180,000 deaths each year, yet they rarely rate a significant spot on the global health agenda.

Several antivenoms used to help people recover from the bites of saw-scaled vipers—a group of incredibly lethal snakes commonly found in Africa, the Middle East and Asia—don’t work well enough, according to an Australian study.Snakebite antidotes contain toxins from…

The WHO commended Cambodia and the Lao People’s Democratic Republic for eradicating trachoma, an eye disease caused by the Chlamydia trachomatisbacteria. The tropical disease is spread from person to person through contact with infected discharge and recurring…

Leprosy can be easily cured with freely available multidrug therapy—if caught early.Therein lies the difficulty: there is no simple test in the early phases, when symptoms are subtle and easily missed. "Diagnosis is made with a feather or a pencil run across the skin, and…

The bite of an infected sandfly transmits kala azar, or leishmaniasis, to more than 400,000 people globally each year, many of them in Kenya.   Without treatment, the parasitic disease—which causes fever, enlargement of the spleen and liver, and weight loss—is deadly.  

Half of all leprosy cases are falling below the radar—meaning that millions of people are missing out on diagnosis and treatment, according to a PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases study.