African Heads of State have added 5 top neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) to their annual disease progress report, raising the profile of diseases that put 1.5 billion people at risk globally—including over 620 million in Africa.The number of people at risk of NTDs has…

What makes snakebites—which permanently disable hundreds of thousands and kill 100,000-plus people annually—especially tragic? Highly effective antivenom treatments exist, just not for everyone.People in sub-Saharan Africa, where snakebites kill 20,000 every year, suffer…

Shrinking malaria’s toll is a great health success of our time—but it still kills 430,000 people annually, 70% of them under 5.The RTS,S vaccine is taking a stab at shrinking those numbers—set to be piloted on hundreds of thousands of children in Ghana, Kenya and Malawi in…

Stamping out malaria in the Asia Pacific could not only save 400,000 lives, but $90 billion in health care costs, according to the first major roundup of the economic benefits of being a malaria-free region.

A spate of development projects in the 1990s brought scores of jobs to Brazil’s Acre State—and by 2000, the region’s first-ever dengue outbreak. Within 10 years the sub-1 million population saw 35,000 cases, finds new research published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Stagnant funding to fight malaria worldwide is stalling progress to fight the disease—cases increased 5 million from 2015-2016, according to new WHO numbers. Drug-resistant strains spreading in Asia are a central worry.

In 113 developing countries, agriculture is 3/4 less productive than other sectors. One reason: neglecting the health of workers, especially in humid areas favored by disease vectors, concludes new research led by Andrew Dillon at Michigan State University.

A deadly shortage of antivenom drugs in Nigeria has left 250 dead from snakebites in the last 3 weeks, prompting health workers to call for a tighter supply chain.   The last supplies of Echitab Plus ICP polyvalent and Echitab G monovalent arrived in August.  The crisis is…

A big GHN welcome to the 4,400 attendees of the American Society for Tropical Medicine and Hygiene conference to GHN's hometown, lovely Baltimore, Maryland. If you're attending, please stop by GHN's booth, #317 and say hi. If you're not in Charm City, watch the following…

I recently met Ankitkumar, an 8-year-old schoolboy from Bihar, India, who 3 years ago developed discoloration on his skin, which was mildly anesthetic. Little known to the medical staff who initially treated him, these were the first symptoms of leprosy.