In its quest to develop new treatments for neglected diseases that are often overlooked by the major drug companies, the Drugs for Neglected Diseases initiative (DNDi) launched the

An outbreak of the rare flesh-eating disease cutaneous leishmaniasis is ravaging a community of about 300 impoverished cave dwellers in Kenya’s Rift Valley. Some say the cure—a regimen of excruciating injections—is almost as bad as the disease.  

With fungal infections on the rise, researchers wonder if climate change is to blame. Science journalist Lindsey Konkel explores the links between human activity, environmental changes and fungal diseases.   Because fungi love moist, temperate climes, a warming world is…

The Financial Times dove head first into reporting on neglected tropical diseases in a massive special report funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Together, the diseases afflict more than 1 billion people worldwide, many of them poor.   Topics highlighted in…

Neglected tropical diseases seize the focus today as WHO brings out a new report, and global experts, donors and policymakers are convening this week on Geneva.  

The CDC’s estimate that approximately 300,000 people are living in the US with Chagas—a parasitic infection that can cause life-threatening heart damage—is now backed up by a new study.  

The UK pledged to double its investment in the fight against neglected tropical diseases—a move expected to protect 200 million people.  

The parasitic worms associated with elephantiasis, which causes painful skin disfigurement, did not cause a recent surge in foot deformities among western Ugandans, as health officials had thought. Instead, say researchers from the Uganda Ministry of Health, the WHO and the…

Working to end neglected tropical diseases also promotes the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), writes the WHO's Mathieu Bangert. He points to his scoping review that documents the impact that interventions aimed at neglected diseases have on each of the 17 SDGs.  

Worldwide, snakebites kill 100,000 people a year and maim or cripple 400,000, mostly in India, Southeast Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Now, chemists at University of California, Irvine, have created a snake venom–neutralizing compound that could be developed into a universal…