In an Olympics bombshell, megastar Simone Biles withdrew from the Tokyo Games yesterday after her first event.  

Bangladesh’s Second Public Health Photo Contest winners reveal stark public health challenges—from food insecurity, to the lack of housing options in megacities like Dhaka, to the scarcity of safe drinking water. They also illuminate—in vivid, vibrant detail—photography’s…

Enteric parasites transmitted via soil are a major contributor to disease worldwide, but a simple household intervention—finished flooring—may reduce their prevalence, according to a new study in rural Bangladesh and Kenya.   Living in a household with finished floors—such…

Neglected tropical diseases—a group of parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections affecting more than 1.7 billion people globally—have held back human progress for millennia, disabling, debilitating, and causing early death if left untreated. Yet NTDs struggle to attract…

81,003. That’s the number of overdose deaths the CDC recorded in the 12 months leading up to last June as lockdowns upended lives and gutted addiction treatment services.   It was the most ever recorded in the US in a 12-month period.

A new WHO plan to combat 20 neglected diseases that plague 1.7 billion people in low-resource countries seeks to rally attention for NTDs even as COVID-19 threatens to roll back progress,

There is precious little research about hookworm in the US these days, but that doesn’t mean it’s not circulating.   Researchers who study the parasites—known to thrive with moist climates and poor sanitation—chiefly focus on Africa, Latin America, and Asia.  

Thank you for your interest in our contest. This contest is now closed, and the 2021 winner has been notified. Check this page for details on the winner during the Consortium of Universities for Global Health's annual meeting, March 12-14, 2021. Do you know an…

The World Health Assembly made bold moves against neglected tropical diseases this week, replacing a 2012 blueprint that is not on track to reach its targets, WHO 

In a world of gloomy global health news, progress against the leading cause of contagious and irreversible blindness—trachoma—is heartening. The WHO has reported a remarkable 91% reduction in people at risk of contracting the neglected tropical disease since 2002.