Lots of drugs are used for epilepsy, which afflicts 1 in 26 people in their lifetime and causes crippling seizures. But very often they don’t work. One researcher described the treatment status quo as a game of whack-a-mole, using the same ineffective drugs to treat myriad…

WHO hatched a plan last year to defeat cervical cancer worldwide. To track progress toward that ambitious goal, researchers published updated numbers on the disease’s toll in the Lancet Global Health.   Here’s what they found:

Since the FDA acknowledged the link between textured breast implants and a rare lymphoma in 2011, hundreds of cases have been diagnosed.   The offending implants have been recalled, but women still must confront a lack of knowledge about this rare cancer and struggle to…

Parents—and doctors—blame the massive Ilva steel plant for the area’s high number of cancer cases, calling it a “cancer factory” and pushing for its closure.   The factory has spewed toxic red dust around Taranto, Italy for 6 decades—flouting environmental standards.    

DAKAR—Senegal’s bustling capital—one of West Africa’s biggest cities, with nearly 2.5 million people—is surprisingly calm and quiet in the early hours of the morning.

An alarming number of Indian women diagnosed with breast cancer do not survive—but low-cost screening devices could make a difference.   Only 66% of Indian women with breast cancer live 5 years beyond diagnosis, compared to about 90% in many Western countries. Late…

After being diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia, Astrid’s success with chemotherapy was short-lived. When stem cell donations became her last hope, she discovered a shocking ethnic disparity in the global pool of donated stem cells, the mother of 2 writes. Stem cells are…

How serious is the threat to sub-Saharan Africa posed by noncommunicable diseases? Consider 2 new findings by Hebe N. Gouda, University of Queensland, and colleagues in the Lancet Global Health. Using data from 1990 to 2017, they found:

Cancer, now the leading killer in wealthy countries, is on track to outpace cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death globally in the next few decades, according to research published yesterday in the Lancet.  

It seems logical that large, long-living mammals would be more prone to cancer—they have more cells and more opportunities for dangerous mutations. But in a “quirk of nature” they actually die of cancer less frequently than their smaller cousins.