MURANGA, KENYA – Jane Mugasha only learned about hemophilia 8 years ago after nearly losing a patient who had come to her hospital for a routine circumcision. “When we tried to dress the wound, the boy would keep on bleeding and bleeding and we did not know what to do,”…

NAIROBI, KENYA – After months of traversing Kenya on buses to get a bruised and constantly bleeding baby to the country’s best hospitals, and after lost tests, delayed results, and wrong diagnoses, Maureen Miruka finally learned in 2001 that her son had hemophilia.

MURANGA, KENYA — Peter Muchoki spent much of his childhood lonely. He wondered why he was different from the other children. He prayed that he and his brother would be cured of what they called their curse.

Intro to the Series An estimated 1 in 10,000 people are born with hemophilia, a blood disorder caused by a lack of proteins needed to stop bleeding. While those in developed countries have access to treatment that allows them to lead normal lives, that is not the case for…

Americans face a lot of health problems—youth at risk, the opioid crisis, and a mental health care crisis to name a few—but the inaugural Bloomberg American Health Summit is all about solutions. GHN will be blogging the Summit today and tomorrow right here, and you can…

A case of diabetes is diagnosed every 21 seconds in the US. The productivity cost of this “silent disease” topped $327 billion in 2017. POLITICO assembled a working group to share strategies for stemming the scourge.   The group agreed that effective prevention happens at…

Colon cancer in Brazil is on the rise, and new research found a correlating rise in pesticide use—the first study of its type in the developing world.  

NUNAVUT—89-year-old Eenoapit Sageatook remembers starting her days with a breakfast of Canada goose or duck eggs and later filling up on cooked or raw meat.

US doctors order more than 4 billion tests annually, and rely on the results to make life-or-death decisions. But many don’t grasp the tests’ fallibility, or the concepts of risk and probability—particularly with regard to false positives, writes Daniel Morgan of the…

Breast cancer is less common in black women, yet they are 40% more likely to die from the disease than white women. New research suggests one possible reason: black women are less likely  to complete 10-year endocrine therapies that can halve the risk of recurrence.