NUNAVUT—89-year-old Eenoapit Sageatook remembers starting her days with a breakfast of Canada goose or duck eggs and later filling up on cooked or raw meat.

US doctors order more than 4 billion tests annually, and rely on the results to make life-or-death decisions. But many don’t grasp the tests’ fallibility, or the concepts of risk and probability—particularly with regard to false positives, writes Daniel Morgan of the…

Breast cancer is less common in black women, yet they are 40% more likely to die from the disease than white women. New research suggests one possible reason: black women are less likely  to complete 10-year endocrine therapies that can halve the risk of recurrence.

Noncommunicable Diseases got the spotlight at the UN General Assembly last Thursday, scoring a High-level Meeting that gave world leaders a chance to talk about their challenges and progress tackling diseases from cancer, to heart disease, to diabetes.

Despite decades of investigation, no one really knows why hotspots of certain cancers exist. For example, a worldwide average of 5.9 people per 100,000 develop esophageal cancer each year, but in Malawi that number is 24 in 100,000.   To solve these mysteries, the…

To the government leaders gathered in New York today for the third UN high-level meeting on noncommunicable diseases, Michael R. Bloomberg brings a positive message: The 41 million annual deaths from NCDs are largely preventable. What’s needed to save millions of lives is…

Youth is an attitude, not a number. It is fundamentally a growth mindset that global health leaders of all ages should embrace to imagine and deliver innovative solutions to our field’s complex challenges.

Nearly 10 million people will die of cancer—the world’s fastest growing killer—this year, according to new incidence and mortality estimates released by the UN International Agency for Research on Cancer.   Insights include:

For one patient, the logic is simple: “When you have money you can live longer, and if not you die.” The rising toll of kidney disease has more and more Cambodians cashing in all their assets to pay for dialysis to keep them alive. The mortality rate of chronic kidney…

Americans living with hemophilia (mostly men, as the genetic condition affects the X chromosome) have to live with care, prioritizing their safety and ability to pay for costly medical support. A single fall or bump can lead to a life-threatening bleed and medical bills can…