Professional athletes are known for overcoming mental limits to achieve incredible physical feats.  For some athletes, the “invisible tattoos” of childhood trauma may manifest as an all-important drive to succeed, writes William D. Parham, director of the Mental Health and…

Hundreds of schoolboys in Afghanistan have been abused by a pedophile ring in the country’s Logar Province. Some were killed by their families when videos of the abuse surfaced on Facebook. One student said a teacher built a private room he used to molest boys; another…

Aid groups were caught off-guard by the violence that began in Syria in 2011 partly because prediction models had estimated a mere 0.05% chance of violence there. But predictions are improving thanks to better data, machine learning, and combining the strengths of…

The toll of intimate partner violence on breastfeeding is rarely considered, much less researched.  

Students in Santa Fe, Texas and Parkland, Florida are struggling at school in the aftermath of devastating mass shootings last year. While the media frenzy has tapered off, applications for federal Project SERV grants—designed to help schools recover from violence—detail…

Hawaii’s gun death rate is only 2.5—far below the US’s 10.6 average. And it’s not because there aren’t guns there. Hawaii has robust hunting and gun collection cultures, but few guns are used in violent crime. This could be due to state laws correlated with lower gun death…

After mass shootings, like those in Dayton, Ohio and El Paso, Texas, medical workers “set aside their emotions” and spring into action, writes Gina Kolata in a New York Times article.   Yet even when they succeed, survivors often face a future of suffering.  

The deaths of 29 people in 2 mass shootings in the US over the weekend shocked Americans numbed by gun violence—and forced them to recognize again the threat posed by white supremacists in a nation with 270 million firearms.

The UN is investigating claims that Russian and Syrian forces used location information on humanitarian sites to bomb hospitals and civilian facilities, The Washington Post reports.

In the 1990s, following an NRA anti-research campaign, US lawmakers squashed any potential for federally funded firearm studies. A deadly scarcity of research followed. If passed, a new proposed bill allocating $50 million for gun violence research could change that—and…