Deploying a decades-old technique, Queensland, Australia researchers successfully wiped out 80% of disease-carrying Aedes aegypti mosquitoes—one of the world’s most dangerous pests. The trial’s success shows a promising potential solution in the global fight against…

Tracking the evolutionary history of North America’s canines led to a surprising link: A sexually transmitted cancer that afflicts modern dogs came from the tumor of a single dog that lived within the last 8,225 years.

Dentistry is moving closer to a mercury-free future as momentum gathers behind a global effort to nix the element from the industry. A growing roster of countries is banishing the use of mercury and amalgam—a mix mercury and other metals used for fillings—in dental…

Life on Mars is a distant reality but there is new hope for humans in finding a way to breathe: a group of aquatic bacteria that thrives in extreme environments.

Machines that can find volatile organic compounds in human breath—gas-chromatography mass-spectrometers—have been around for awhile. But analyzing them is arduous and error-prone; reams of data on complex compounds must be analyzed by hand. To expedite the process,…

Over 60 bat-borne viruses, including Ebola, are known to infect humans, and researchers at China's Wuhan Institute of Virology (WIV) are looking to uncover why bats can transmit these viruses without getting sick themselves.

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing kits like 23andMe inform buyers of their predisposition to a host of illnesses but they don’t cover assessments, next steps or even psychological support following troubling or confusing results—services traditionally provided by genetic…

Disorganized data is holding back research into genetic data that can help predict which drugs will work on tumors.

Testing a vaccine rollout during an emergency presents special challenges, but that is the task underway for the WHO, MSF, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s ministry of health, detailed in an intriguing perspective by Charlotte J. Haug.

In its deadly resurgence, black lung disease is more common among Appalachia’s coal miners than previously reported by government research, which relied on voluntary testing of working miners.  A new set of studies uncovered a “relentless and increasing progression of…