With an eye to studying human development and finding new ways to treat reproductive problems, scientists have created the first living 3D models of human embryos—or embryoids.  

Unpaid and often unrecognized, peer reviewers are the unsung backbone of academia. But on the 7-year-old website Publons, reviewers are coming out the woodwork, using the platform to publish their reviews and identify their work. This open peer review model ought to become…

Children in rural, low-income regions of Alaska are 5-6 times more likely to experience hearing loss than other US children. Worse, it’s preventable. Susan Emmett of Duke University is working with the Hearing Norton Sound project to use Alaska’s thriving telemedicine…

Women comprise 80% of all US autoimmune disease cases but most theories about this point to “how” not “why.”   Evolutionary biologist Melissa Wilson may have the “why.” “Pregnancy-compensation hypothesis” postulates that women evolved to be pregnant for most of their lives…

Phages—viruses that infect bacteria—are apparently quite sociable. Once thought to passively acquire bacterial distress signals, phages actually communicate with each other by releasing a tiny protein when infecting cells. Messages get “louder” as more cells are infected,…

Rebelling against the soaring subscription costs, the University of California system recently dropped its deal with publishing giant Elsevier, which rakes in billions each year. The rebellion may grow because publishers profit by getting “a lot of taxpayer-funded, highly…

It’s high time science bid farewell to the default male model in animal research, according to the neurologist Rebecca Shansky.   Since 2016 sex has been a required variable in NIH studies, but the bias persists, she writes in a commentary in Science.  

Modern medicine eradicated many problematic things but, according to William Parker, may have overstepped with helminths. Parasitic worms may help with immune function in healthy adults. Early research shows success introducing helminths in patients with inflammatory bowel…

Could researchers tap mobile phone record troves to help save lives? A debate is afoot, and Amy Maxmen exhaustively investigated the pros and cons.   How it works: Anonymized, aggregated records of the origin and timing of texts and calls provide population movement clues…

Resistant to water, oil and heat, per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are ubiquitous in everything from clothing to nonstick cookware—and now soil, drinking water and the human body. Yet scientists know precious little about the so-called “forever chemicals” and…