Uncorrected vision impairment takes an outsized toll on women in low- and middle-income countries. The hazards of traditional roles are part of the reason—such as hygiene risks of child care and open-flame cooking, which can lead to trachoma. 80% of cases of advanced…

The new World Meteorological Organization’s State of the Climate report warns that we’re running out of time: 

Africa’s population is among the fastest-growing and fastest-urbanizing in the world. More than half of the globe’s population growth from 2015-2050 is set to take place on the continent. And by 2050, city-dwellers will make up almost 60% of its population. How will global…

17 died in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Florida last February—but that was not the end. 2 survivors took their own lives in the last week, prompting activists to Tweet “17 + 2," The Washington Post reports.

The scourge of smallpox killed some 500 million people in the 19th and 20th centuries before being eradicated in 1980. While there’s plenty of the current vaccine to cover the US population, it poses complications to some groups, and debate has swirled over whether a…

Duke University knowingly submitted a staffer’s falsified data to court millions of dollars in federal grant money, according to a whistleblower’s lawsuit that will see the university shell out a $112.5 million settlement. Former Duke employee Joseph Thomas alleged that…

It looks like the hippocampus is capable of generating new neurons after all—up to the ninth decade of life, according to a new study in Nature that may breathe new life into Alzheimer’s research.

Surgery might not immediately come to mind as a solution in the fight to end tuberculosis. Certainly, antibiotics are the standard treatment for this infectious disease that affects 10 million people worldwide.

The good news is that tuberculosis deaths are declining steadily. The bad news is that we are wildly off track to meet the bold targets set for controlling the world’s #1 lethal infectious disease.

Global health care has a supply and demand problem. Women are primed to fill the gap, but gender inequity in the workplace squanders female talent, compromising health systems. The current paradigm—men leading and women delivering health care—is built on inequities. These…